ENTREPRENEUR INTERVIEW WITH JAMES GUERRINI

What is a typical day for you?

A typical day at Mediaraft depends entirely on what sort of projects we have on and the stage they’re at – I usually begin by answering emailsand dealing with any new client enquiries before heading into the office to meet the team and get the coffee on! We’ll then have a quick meeting to discuss priorities for the day and assign tasks, splitting the team into small groups in order to move projects along as smoothly as possible. I tend to oversee the work that’s going on, managing projects, but also getting involved at every stage, to offer support and ideas. We finish our day when I’m happy with what’s been achieved, but the team can take breaks whenever they want, we don’t heavily structure our working day. As long as the work’s done, it’s all good.

What motivated you to get into the world of business?

Hopefully without sounding too cheesy or obvious, it was my Dad (he’s a successful property developer who lives and works in Poland). After studying media at college, I decided I wanted a drastic change; I wanted to enter the business world fast. So, I flew out to Poland where my Dad took me under his wing for a while, he wanted to show me that business and success was what you made of it, so he’d take me along to meetings with huge investments taking place, with all of these big wigs from international firms and made sure I could hold my own with them, giving presentations, showing me it wasn’t out of reach.

He showed me the possibilities and value of working to achieve your own goals, even (and especially) if that meant working my way up from the bottom rung of whatever ladder I chose.

Who inspires you?

I get constant excitement from following the careers and successes of people who inspire me, it’s a huge part of my driving force and I find massive solace in researching people who’ve built or developed something that’s changed the world – especially in the field of technology. I could go on for days, but Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, Gary Vaynerchuck, and Guy Kawasaki are a good collective example of the people I look to for examples of how to do it right.

My team are also a huge inspiration, each and every day. I’ve found that another true passion for me is training/teaching creatives and helping them to see what they’re truly capable of. I will challenge people and they’ll reciprocate which is important for all parties and means that we’re providing consistently valuable learning experiences for each other.

What hobbies or extra-circular activities do you feel have helped you in your working life?

Having an outlet is incredibly important, you need something to brush away the cobwebs when you’re in a high stress position (which working for yourself always is) and I’ve always enjoyed cycling, especially down-hilling. It’s a total rush. I also practice Mindfulness, which is a quickly growing take on meditation and for me and several people I know, a fantastic way to teach yourself to switch off and act as an antithesis to work.

How did you make yourself stand out from the crowd during recruitment?

In the past, getting jobs such as Marketing Management positions at large firms or at the start as a graphic designer (this was pre social media days) I would make sure that my CV / Portfolio communicated who I am through the design and presentation and the copy. I think that people quickly see I’m a tad quirky, but completely obsessed with the industry I’m in. That helps!

I also make sure that when I’m being interviewed, I demonstrate that I can quickly analyse and interpret what will help that particular company to thrive and expand, I’m not afraid to suggest new methods or to speak up and be noticed even if it means a bit of constructive criticism. Be yourself, stand tall and show your excitement and passion for what you can do for them.

What do you know now that you wish you could tell yourself when you were just starting out?

I’d have to tell myself that it only gets harder, the bigger your company gets. There seems to be a focus on starting out and finding your footing as a business, but once you’ve got clients, once the stakes are higher and the staff are there, it’s increasingly difficult, you have a responsibility to make sure projects are delivered, no excuses. You also have to listen to the market and be willing to pivot from your initial plan or focal point, if that’s where the demand is, you can’t be too sentimental about what started it all.

What advantages do smaller companies, such as Mediaraft with 6 team members, hold over larger agencies?

Personality – All the way! We aren’t a faceless corporation, or a massive team with offices in multiple countries, but that means that when you pick up the phone to get some help with your new website, or need a social media campaign managing, it’s us you speak with and us who’re working with you to achieve your goals. We’re genuinely good friends with loads of our long term and past clients; we take the time to prioritise getting to know the people behind the business, something large agencies only do to the point of designing their branding and cultivating a lead. Our hearts are in it in a totally unique way.

How do you see Mediaraft growing in the near future?

It’s a tough, highly competitive industry, but we’re constantly developing new ways to stand out and ensure Mediaraft’s evolving. As well as constantly working to push our brand position and improve our approach and process, we’re developing a new “arm” or sister company, called “Pumped Social” (purely offering social media and content marketing). We’re looking to start a training programme too, fairly soon – We’ve seen so many people graduate, or spoken to people who are weighing up their options about studying, who aren’t industry ready and find it difficult to find their footing or even a basic position, so we want to bridge that gap for creatives and offer them opportunities to train with us, learn from us and gain that extra edge many companies are looking for.

You’ve worked with interns from Leicester University in the past, can you speak to the value of programmes like this, for both the interns and the companies taking them on?

Work experience and intern placements are fantastic – It’s a great way for students to understand the industry they’re hoping to break into, as well as a real eye opener for them, in terms of the reality of the job, day to day.

Especially with design, I think it’s imperative to have a genuine appreciation of the fact that you don’t get to design what you want or spend your days coming up with endless gorgeous, “arty” concepts: You’re working to a brief, often, your client will be picky, hate the design you love the most (and be very vocal about it!), you will also have to work with existing corporate identities which can be challenging and something most interns have never worked with.

I can’t speak for other agencies, but if I see a spark in someone, I’ll push them, even if they’re only with us for a week or two – It’s my management style, but it means you’ll get my time, meaning students can seriously up their game. They work on live projects, talking to clients, coming to meetings and I expect hard work. It’s an incredibly competitive game, so anything extra to help you stand out, especially in terms of experience – you just have to go for it!

A BSc Accounting degree provides the foundations on which to build a successful career

iStock_75716011_XXXLARGE.jpg

Accountancy is a profession in transition. The traditional skills necessary to flourish as an accountant – namely the ability to help clients minimise tax and balance the books – are slipping somewhat by the wayside thanks to the emergence of dedicated and powerful computer software. The vocation, which has in the past been resilient through decades of industrial, political and societal change, is now going through an almighty evolution.

However, with great change comes great opportunity, and the current crop of newly qualified accountants are blessed with the chance to shape the future of a sector that will, in all likelihood, play an increasingly essential role in helping businesses and individuals make their hard-earned money go further.

Accountants have often suffered from the stereotype of being stuffy introverts, but that’s by no means the label the accountants of the future will be plastered with; dynamism, energy and the ability to provide top-notch financial advice will be the attributes required by the next generation of accountants, with extroverts likely to thrive in this more hands-on, interactive and collaborative environment: offering a personal touch is going to become ever more important.

admission_tests.jpg

Not only will being a people person become even more necessary for accountants in the years to come but so will being adept at utilising advanced computer software, particularly that which harnesses cloud technology. Being able to work on a document that can be sent, assessed and modified by client and accountant alike in the space of a few seconds is just one reason why working with a keyboard and mouse rather than old-school pen and paper is an accounting must.

If you’re looking for Ilford college London that can offer you the fundamentals required to shape a successful, and fruitful, career in the world of finance, then Mont Rose is the establishment for you. If you require additional information about the course, such as what modules you will study, when you can start and what doors can be opened upon the course’s completion, do not hesitate to get in touch.

All of our courses are funded by Student Finance England, and we are more than happy to work with you to discover if you are eligible for funding. Get in touch today, and take your first steps on the journey to an exciting and stimulating accounting career.

Before the startup dream, gain practical HND Business knowledge

o-HIGHER-EDUCATION-facebook.jpg

As startup culture continues to thrive around London’s Silicon Roundabout, more and more young entrepreneurs are thinking about rushing their cool idea to market. However, be warned that without a basic understanding of business fundamentals, your distributed, cloud-based, crowdfunded, the high-technology dream will likely remain just that.

Even if your business plan is as prosaic as something like a better cleaning or services company, learning the business ropes before you rush into founding a company will give your concept a better foundation. An HND in Business can provide a key overview and insights into the many roles that a startup will need. From business development, human resources, hiring your first staff and administration, understanding marketing, along with the basics of finance and business law, a good grasp of everything we offer will help your company go a long way.

Accounting_HND.jpg

We provide a practical grounding, as well as the theory to ensure your course provides you with the skills to succeed in the real world. Whatever your previous experience or education, a top up degree business management at Mont Rose College should provide you with fantastic preparation for your business adventure. As a higher education provider, based in Ilford, Greater London, our popular courses should put you in touch with people at the same level of drive and ambition, who may prove useful allies, colleagues or advisors as you commence on any startup business or project.

While most startup investors, especially American ones, expect founders to have an MBA or engineering degree, in the UK passion and a product are seen as a base starting point. Still, having a basic business knowledge and demonstrating that you are keen to educate yourself will stand you in good stead, and provide a great practical advantage when it comes to finding funding.

At Mont Rose College we provide both the knowledge and the social fabric that could help turn your business into a successful idea. Even if you don’t have a dream yet, studying here and with access to the great startup heart of London at Tech City and Silicon Roundabout could help find you a team to work with or other founders to get started on a project. Or, if you just want a way to get into an existing company, aHND Business Marketing will demonstrate a keen understanding of modern methods and help you gain an advantage when interviewing for any number of management, marketing, accounting, finance or other roles.

Lecturer in Business Studies

csm_121130.jpg

Mont Rose College London (MRCMS)

Mont Rose College London is an independent Higher Education training provider and delivering HE courses from last many years. Mont Rose College is seeking to employ enthusiastic and committed Lecturers in the fields of Business Administration. Applications are invited from individuals holding a Master’s or a PhD in a relevant subject, with an ability to teach at the undergraduate level.  Candidates should be highly organised with strong communication skills.

The Business Studies lecturers are required in the following subjects:

  • Human Resource Management
  • Product & Service Development
  • Integrated Marketing Communication
  • Digital Marketing
  • Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
  • Research project

Responsibilities:
Preparing and delivering Business Studies courses at BTEC Level 4 & 5
Providing tutorial and pastoral support for students across college
Developing and delivering on schemes of work, lesson plans and individual learning plan to increase the learning experience for the students
Uploading lecture notes on college VLE
Marking coursework and providing feedback to each student
Answering student queries face to face and via email
Performing an administrative task

bs.jpg

The Candidate:
The successful candidate for the Lecturer in Business Studies will have:

  • Master’s degree or PhD in Business related fields
  • A UK recognised teaching qualification such as a PGCE, DTLLS or Cert ED or be working towards them.
  • Experience in teaching Business BTEC Level 4 and 5
  • Experience in teaching UK / EU students
  • Ability to engage and motivate students
  • Appropriate Teaching courses in London experience and in-depth knowledge of your particular field
  • Experience of Curriculum development
  • Ability to work as a team member

Only those candidates are encouraged to apply who do not require a work permit to work in the UK.

Location: Ilford-London, IG1 4TG

How to apply:
Applicants are advised to provide us following documents in order to apply for the post

  • An updated curriculum vitae (CV)
  • A letter explaining how you meet the requirements of the said post

Salary and contract: Gross salary £22,000.00 – £29,000.00 per annum depending on experience and qualifications (full-time, temporary, 35hrs per week contract from which up to 24hrs teaching and 11hrs for administrative work)

Differences Between BTEC HND and HNC courses Explained

Students-in-a-group-happy-700x466.jpg

BTEC HND and HNC courses are popular study options, and are highly regarded by employers. But, what are they exactly, and what are the key differences between them?

Both BTEC HND and HNC courses are provided by further or higher education institutions, and focus on work-based learning. They equip students with the practical skills required to start a career in a wide range of areas, such as accountancy, engineering, computing or photography.

How do BTEC HND and HNC courses differ?

A Higher National Diploma (HND) can be differentiated from a Higher National Certificate (HNC) by the amount of time it takes to complete the course. An HND normally takes two years to complete full time, or three to four years when studied part time. An HNC typically takes just a year to finish if taken full time, or two years if studied part time.

If you’ve already completed an HNC, you may then be able to complete a relevant HND in one year.

slide-31.jpg

BTEC HND and HNC courses are not equal in qualification value. An HNC is one level below an HND, so that HNC health and social care courses are equivalent to studying one year at university, while HND courses are the same as studying two years at university. On the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF), HNCs are rated at level 4, and HNDs at level 5.

HNCs and HNDs are flexible degree pathway programmes and can be converted into a full degree with additional study. Students taking an HNC can transfer to the second year of a degree course, while an HND in business normally lets you start the third year of a degree course.

Both HNC and HND courses enable students to study a subject to see if they like it, before deciding whether to take it to degree level. They also provide a practical, group-based approach to learning, and are a more affordable alternative to studying a traditional degree at university. Despite this, they are valued qualifications by employers and respected entry routes to many careers, and also count towards membership of professional organisations.

HNC and HND courses are available in a wide range of subjects, and most students begin studying them after taking A levels. You normally need one higher level qualification, such as an A level, to enter an HNC course, and two higher level qualifications, or two A levels, to start an HND course – although this varies by course and course provider.

Welcome to Mont Rose College London

make-a-right-choice.jpg

Mont Rose College of Management & Sciences is an institution committed to providing the finest teaching and public service in student development and continuing education. It offers a wide array of high-quality programmes built around a distinctive teaching style leading to certificates and Diploma in education and training.

Mont Rose College of Management & Sciences is authorised by the UK Border Agency to recruit overseas students. Mont Rose College of Management and Sciences has been awarded Highly Trusted Status by the UKBA which shows that we have all the necessary systems in place to meet our duties as a sponsor.

Extra Curriculum Activities

hotel-management-courses-colleges-institutes1.jpg

In the early hours of Tuesday morning our dedicated hospitality management courses students met at our premises as they were accompanied by one of our leading managers and one of our most distinguished tutors.

There was a coach that had been ordered with compliments from Mont Rose College to transport students from the premises to another well-established building.

The Journey was estimated at 6 hours long as everyone was travelling to the South of Wales. The students were excited despite the time length.

After hours of singing and smiling on the coach, they had arrived at St. Mary’s Hotel. Here the students were able to expand their practical knowledge, develop their customer service skills and have a clearer understanding of the hospitality industry.